English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Cortisol stress resonance in the laboratory is associated with inter-couple diurnal cortisol covariation in daily life

Engert, V., Ragsdale, A. M., & Singer, T. (2018). Cortisol stress resonance in the laboratory is associated with inter-couple diurnal cortisol covariation in daily life. Hormones and Behavior, 98, 183-190. doi:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2017.12.018.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-0457-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-0458-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Engert, Veronika1, Author              
Ragsdale, Amy M.1, Author
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Empathy; Stress resonance; Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; Cortisol; Covariation
 Abstract: In laboratory environments individuals may display empathic cortisol stress responses merely from observing another experience psychosocial stress. Moreover, within couples, women synchronize their own to their partners' stress-induced cortisol release. We investigated whether a woman's tendency to experience such cortisol stress resonance in a controlled laboratory task is associated with the degree to which her and her partner's diurnal cortisol levels covary in a naturalistic environment. Such habitual cortisol covariation may be a pathway via which close relationships influence health outcomes. Forty-four men completed the Trier Social Stress Test while their female partners observed the situation, either via “real-life” (one-way mirror) or “virtual” (video) observation modality. Later, the couples collected diurnal cortisol samples over two weekdays. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that the degree to which couples covaried in their daily cortisol secretion was associated with the female partner's cortisol stress resonance in the laboratory, and that this association was stronger if stress resonance was assessed in the “real-life” observation condition. Specifically, women with higher cortisol stress resonance were more closely linked to their partner's diurnal cortisol secretion. Neither momentary partner presence during sampling nor relationship duration or quality accounted for the association. By showing that covariation in the laboratory has ecological validity in naturalistic conditions, these results make an important methodological contribution to the study of dyadic processes. Given that close relationships exert immense influence over individual health outcomes, understanding the association between acute and chronic physiological linkage may provide important insight into the mechanisms by which close relationships impact well-being.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-11-132017-05-232017-12-292018-02-092018-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.yhbeh.2017.12.018
PMID: 29307695
Other: Epub 2018
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Hormones and Behavior
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 98 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 183 - 190 Identifier: ISSN: 0018-506X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922645022