English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research

Engert, V., Merla, A., Grant, J. A., Cardone, D., Tusche, A., & Singer, T. (2014). Exploring the use of thermal infrared imaging in human stress research. PLoS One, 9(3): e90782. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0090782.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-03CD-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-03CE-1
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Engert_Exploring.pdf (Publisher version), 773KB
Name:
Engert_Exploring.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
2014
Copyright Info:
© 2014 Engert et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Engert, Veronika1, Author              
Merla, Arcangelo2, 3, Author
Grant, Joshua A.1, Author              
Cardone, Daniela2, 3, Author
Tusche, Anita1, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Institute of Advanced Biomedical Technologies (ITAB), Gabriele D'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neuroscience and Imaging, Gabriele D'Annunzio University, Chieti-Pescara, Italy, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: High resolution thermal infrared imaging is a pioneering method giving indices of sympathetic activity via the contact-free recording of facial tissues (thermal imprints). Compared to established stress markers, the great advantage of this method is its non-invasiveness. The goal of our study was to pilot the use of thermal infrared imaging in the classical setting of human stress research. Thermal imprints were compared to established stress markers (heart rate, heart rate variability, finger temperature, alpha-amylase and cortisol) in 15 participants undergoing anticipation, stress and recovery phases of two laboratory stress tests, the Cold Pressor Test and the Trier Social Stress Test. The majority of the thermal imprints proved to be change-sensitive in both tests. While correlations between the thermal imprints and established stress markers were mostly non-significant, the thermal imprints (but not the established stress makers) did correlate with stress-induced mood changes. Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that in contrast to the established stress markers the thermal imprints could not disambiguate anticipation, stress and recovery phases of both tests. Overall, these results suggest that thermal infrared imaging is a valuable method for the estimation of sympathetic activity in the stress laboratory setting. The use of this non-invasive method may be particularly beneficial for covert recordings, in the study of special populations showing difficulties in complying with the standard instruments of data collection and in the domain of psychophysiological covariance research. Meanwhile, the established stress markers seem to be superior when it comes to the characterization of complex physiological states during the different phases of the stress cycle.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-08-092014-02-052014-03-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090782
PMID: 24675709
PMC: PMC3968009
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (3) Sequence Number: e90782 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850