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  How self-generated thought shapes mood - The relation between mind-wandering and mood depends on the socio-temporal content of thoughts

Ruby, F. J. M., Smallwood, J., Engen, H., & Singer, T. (2013). How self-generated thought shapes mood - The relation between mind-wandering and mood depends on the socio-temporal content of thoughts. PLoS One, 8(10): e77554. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0077554.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-0393-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-0394-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Ruby_HowSelf.pdf (Publisher version), 751KB
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© 2013 Ruby et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

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 Creators:
Ruby, Florence J. M.1, 2, Author              
Smallwood, Jonathan1, 2, Author              
Engen, Haakon1, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Psychology, University of York, Heslington, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Recent work has highlighted that the generation of thoughts unrelated to the current environment may be both a cause and a consequence of unhappiness. The current study used lag analysis to examine whether the relationship between self-generated thought and negative affect depends on the content of the thoughts themselves. We found that the emotional content could strongly predict subsequent mood (e.g. negative thoughts were associated with subsequent negative mood). However, this direct relationship was modulated by the socio-temporal content of the thoughts: thoughts that were past- and other-related were associated with subsequent negative mood, even if current thought content was positive. By contrast, future- and self-related thoughts preceded improvements of mood, even when current thought content was negative. These results highlight the important link between self-generated thought and mood and suggest that the socio-temporal content plays an important role in determining whether an individual's future affective state will be happy or sad.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2013-03-262013-09-032013-10-23
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0077554
PMID: 24194889
PMC: PMC3806791
Other: eCollection 2013
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 (10) Sequence Number: e77554 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: /journals/resource/1000000000277850