English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Influences of oxytocin and respiratory sinus arrhythmia on emotions and social behavior in daily life

Isgett, S. F., Kok, B. E., Baczkowski, B., Algoe, S. B., Grewen, K. M., & Fredrickson, B. L. (2017). Influences of oxytocin and respiratory sinus arrhythmia on emotions and social behavior in daily life. Emotion, 17(8), 1156-1165. doi:10.1037/emo0000301.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FB93-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FB94-B
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Isgett, Suzannah F.1, Author
Kok, Bethany E.2, Author              
Baczkowski, Blazej3, 4, Author              
Algoe, Sara B.1, Author
Grewen, Karen M.5, Author
Fredrickson, Barbara L.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
3Max Planck Research Group Neuroanatomy and Connectivity, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356546              
4Institute of Psychology, Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Heart rate variability; Vagal tone; Positive emotions; Social connectedness; Positive psychology
 Abstract: The literature concerning biological influences on positive social behavior shows that, in nonthreatening contexts, tonic oxytocin (OT) and respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) each predict positive, affiliative behaviors toward certain others and are associated with positive health outcomes. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the degree to which the positive affiliative correlates of OT and RSA can be distinguished when observed at the level of everyday life events. A sample of midlife adults (N = 73) provided tonic indices of these biological characteristics, as well as perceptions of a variety of common life events alongside reports of their emotions during those events. OT and RSA each independently moderated the link between perceived event sociality and positive emotions, whereas only RSA predicted the probability of being with other people during an event. These findings suggest that OT and RSA may each be linked to positive social experiences in complementary yet distinct ways.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-01-132015-10-152017-02-042017-03-302017-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1037/emo0000301
PMID: 28358561
PMC: PMC5751753
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : DGE-1144081
Funding program : NSF Graduate Research Fellowship
Funding organization : National Science Foundation (NSF)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : European Science Foundation (ESF)
Project name : -
Grant ID : R01NR012899
Funding program : -
Funding organization : National Institutes of Health (NIH)

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Emotion
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 17 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1156 - 1165 Identifier: ISSN: 1528-3542
CoNE: /journals/resource/1528-3542