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  Psychological, endocrine, and neural correlates of attentional bias in subclinical depression

Dedovic, K., Giebl, S., Duchesne, A., Lue, S. D., Andrews, J., Efanov, S., et al. (2016). Psychological, endocrine, and neural correlates of attentional bias in subclinical depression. Anxiety, Stress, and Coping, 29(5), 479-496. doi:10.1080/10615806.2015.1101457.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FF4E-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FF4F-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Dedovic, Katarina1, 2, Author
Giebl, Saskia3, Author
Duchesne, Annie1, 4, Author
Lue, Sonja D.1, Author
Andrews, Julie1, Author
Efanov, Simona1, Author
Engert, Veronika1, 5, Author              
Beaudry, Thomas6, Author
Baldwin, Mark W.7, Author
Pruessner, Jens C.1, 6, Author
Affiliations:
1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Social and Affective Neuroscience Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Biology, Bishop's University, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
5Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634552              
6McGill Centre for Studies in Aging, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
7Department of Psychology, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Attentional bias; fMRI; Subclinical depression; Coping; Cortisol
 Abstract: Our knowledge with respect to psychological, endocrine, and neural correlates of attentional bias in individuals with high vulnerability to developing depression – the subclinically depressed, still remains limited. Design: The study used a 2 × 2 mixed design. Methods: Attentional bias toward happy and sad faces in healthy (N = 26) and subclinically depressed individuals (N = 22) was assessed via a neuroimaging dot-probe attention task. Participants also completed trait and state psychological measures and provided saliva samples for cortisol analysis. Results: The subclinical group showed attentional bias toward happy faces; past use of problem-focused coping strategies when dealing with a personally relevant stressor as well as state levels of anxiety, together, contributed to this bias. In the control group, the happy attentional bias was positively correlated with activity in the right caudate. In the subclinical group, the bias was negatively associated with the left fusiform gyrus and positively with the left inferior parietal lobule and bilateral putamen. We observed group differences in association between cortisol levels during the task and neural activity during happy attentional bias processing within the key regions involved in attention. Conclusions: The attentional bias toward happy faces may reflect an active coping attempt by the subclinical participants.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2015-01-072015-09-212015-10-292016-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/10615806.2015.1101457
PMID: 26419271
Other: Epub 2015
 Degree: -

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Title: Anxiety, Stress, and Coping
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Abingdon : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 29 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 479 - 496 Identifier: ISSN: 1061-5806
CoNE: /journals/resource/1061-5806