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  Stimulus-driven reorienting impairs executive control of attention: Evidence for a common bottleneck in anterior insula

Trautwein, F.-M., Singer, T., & Kanske, P. (2016). Stimulus-driven reorienting impairs executive control of attention: Evidence for a common bottleneck in anterior insula. Cerebral Cortex, 26(11), 4136-4147. doi:10.1093/cercor/bhw225.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FB39-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FB3A-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Trautwein, Fynn-Mathis1, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Kanske, Philipp1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              

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Free keywords: fMRI; Functional connectivity; Flanker task; Spatial cueing
 Abstract: A classical model of human attention holds that independent neural networks realize stimulus-driven reorienting and executive control of attention. Questioning full independence, the two functions do, however, engage overlapping networks with activations in cingulo-opercular regions such as anterior insula (AI) and a reverse pattern of activation (stimulus-driven reorienting), and deactivation (executive control) in temporoparietal junction (TPJ). To test for independent versus shared neural mechanisms underlying stimulus-driven and executive control of attention, we used fMRI and a task that isolates individual from concurrent demands in both functions. Results revealed super-additive increases of left AI activity and behavioral response costs under concurrent demands, suggesting a common bottleneck for stimulus-driven reorienting and executive control of attention. These increases were mirrored by non-additive decreases of activity in the default mode network (DMN), including posterior TPJ, regions where activity increased with off-task processes. The deactivations in posterior TPJ were spatially separated from stimulus-driven reorienting related activation in anterior TPJ, a differentiation that replicated in task-free resting state. Furthermore, functional connectivity indicated inhibitory coupling between posterior TPJ and AI during concurrent attention demands. These results demonstrate a role of AI in stimulus-driven and executive control of attention that involves down-regulation of internally directed processes in DMN.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-06-242016-07-022016-08-222016-10-17
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhw225
PMID: 27550866
PMC: PMC5066828
Other: Epub ahead of print
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Title: Cerebral Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 26 (11) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4136 - 4147 Identifier: ISSN: 1047-3211
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925592440