English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Who am I? Differential effects of three contemplative mental trainings on emotional word use in self-descriptions

Lumma, A.-L., Böckler, A., Vrticka, P., & Singer, T. (2017). Who am I? Differential effects of three contemplative mental trainings on emotional word use in self-descriptions. Self and Identity, 16(5), 607-628. doi:10.1080/15298868.2017.1294107.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FA3C-1 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FA3D-0
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Lumma_2017.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Lumma_2017.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Lumma, Anna-Lena1, Author              
Böckler, Anne1, 2, Author              
Vrticka, Pascal1, Author              
Singer, Tania1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634552              
2Department of Psychology, Julius Maximilian University, Würzburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Self-concept content; Emotional word use; Mental training; Meditation; Trait affect
 Abstract: In a large-scale longitudinal mental training study, we examined whether learning different contemplative practices can change the emotional content of people’s self-concept as assessed through emotional word use in the Twenty Statement Test. During three 3-month training modules, participants learned distinct practices targeting attentional, socio-affective, or socio-cognitive capacities, or were re-tested. Emotional word use specifically increased after socio-cognitive training including perspective-taking on self and others, compared to attentional and socio-affective compassion-based trainings, and retest-controls. Overall, our findings demonstrate training-induced behavioral plasticity of the emotional self-concept content in healthy adults and could indicate greater emotional granularity. These findings can inform future interventions in mental health, given that alterations in self-referential processing are a common contributing factor in psychopathology.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-03-282017-02-032017-03-052017-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/15298868.2017.1294107
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show hide
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Max Planck Society
Project name : Plasticity of the Empathic Brain: Structural and Functional MRI Studies on the Effect of Empathy Training on the Human Brain and Prosocial Behaviour / EMPATHICBRAIN
Grant ID : 205557
Funding program : Funding Programme 7
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Self and Identity
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (5) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 607 - 628 Identifier: ISSN: 1529-8868
CoNE: /journals/resource/1529-8868