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  Neural evidence for the subliminal processing of facial trustworthiness in infancy

Jessen, S., & Grossmann, T. (2019). Neural evidence for the subliminal processing of facial trustworthiness in infancy. Neuropsychologia, 126, 46-53. doi:10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.025.

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 Creators:
Jessen, Sarah1, 2, Author           
Grossmann, Tobias2, 3, Author           
Affiliations:
1Department of Neurology, University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              
3Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Infancy; Trustworthiness; EEG; Face perception; Subliminal processing
 Abstract: Face evaluation is thought to play a vital role in human social interactions. One prominent aspect is the evaluation of facial signs of trustworthiness, which has been shown to occur reliably, rapidly, and without conscious awareness in adults. Recent developmental work indicates that the sensitivity to facial trustworthiness has early ontogenetic origins as it can already be observed in infancy. However, it is unclear whether infants’ sensitivity to facial signs of trustworthiness relies upon conscious processing of a face or, similar to adults, occurs also in response to subliminal faces. To investigate this question, we conducted an event-related brain potential (ERP) study, in which we presented 7-month-old infants with faces varying in trustworthiness. Facial stimuli were presented subliminally (below infants’ face visibility threshold) for only 50 ms and then masked by presenting a scrambled face image. Our data revealed that infants’ ERP responses to subliminally presented faces differed as a function of trustworthiness. Specifically, untrustworthy faces elicited an enhanced negative slow wave (800–1000 ms) at frontal and central electrodes. The current findings critically extend prior work by showing that, similar to adults, infants’ neural detection of facial signs of trustworthiness occurs also in response to subliminal face. This supports the view that detecting facial trustworthiness is an early developing and automatic process in humans.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-03-072017-01-122017-04-212017-04-222019-03-18
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2017.04.025
PMID: 28442339
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Title: Neuropsychologia
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 126 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 46 - 53 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-3932
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925428258