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  Third-order neurons in the lateral horn enhance bilateral contrast of odor inputs through contralateral inhibition in Drosophila

Mohamed, A., Hansson, B. S., & Sachse, S. (2019). Third-order neurons in the lateral horn enhance bilateral contrast of odor inputs through contralateral inhibition in Drosophila. Frontiers in Physiology, 10: 851. doi:10.3389/fphys.2019.00851.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2019.00851 (Publisher version)
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Mohamed, Ahmed1, 2, Author              
Hansson, Bill S.1, Author              
Sachse, Silke3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Prof. B. S. Hansson, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421894              
2IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421900              
3Research Group Dr. S. Sachse, Olfactory Coding, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421914              

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 Abstract: The survival and reproduction of Drosophila melanogaster depends heavily on its ability to determine the location of an odor source and either to move towards or away from it. Despite the very small spatial separation between the two antennae and the redundancy in sensory neuron projection to both sides of the brain, Drosophila can resolve the concentration gradient by comparing the signal strength between the two antennae. When an odor stimulates the antennae asymmetrically, ipsilateral projection neurons from the first olfactory center are more strongly excited compared to the contralateral ones. However, it remains elusive how higher-order neurons process such asymmetric or lateralized odor inputs. Here, we monitored and analyzed for the first time the activity patterns of a small cluster of third-order neurons (so-called VLP neurons) to asymmetric olfactory stimulation using two-photon calcium imaging. Our data demonstrate that lateralized odors evoke distinct activation of these neurons in the left and right brain hemisphere as a result of contralateral inhibition. Moreover, using laser transection experiments we show that this contralateral inhibition is mediated by presynaptic neurons most likely located in the lateral horn. Finally, we propose that this inhibitory interaction between higher-order neurons facilitates odor lateralization and plays a crucial role in olfactory navigation behavior of Drosophila, a theory that needs to be experimentally addressed in future studies.

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 Dates: 2019-06-202019-07-09
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: Other: SAC016
DOI: 10.3389/fphys.2019.00851
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Title: Frontiers in Physiology
  Other : Front. Physiol.
  Abbreviation : FPHYS
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 851 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-042X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-042X