English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  The origins of cannabis smoking: chemical residue evidence from the first millennium BCE in the Pamirs

Ren, M., Tang, Z., Wu, X., Spengler, R., Jiang, H., Yang, Y., et al. (2019). The origins of cannabis smoking: chemical residue evidence from the first millennium BCE in the Pamirs. Science Advances, 5(6): eaaw1391. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aaw1391.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-E91F-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-E920-2
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2276.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
shh2276.pdf
Description:
OA
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Ren, Meng, Author
Tang, Zihua, Author
Wu, Xinhua, Author
Spengler, Robert1, Author              
Jiang, Hongen, Author
Yang, Yimin, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Chemical residues; East Asia; Phytochemical; Western China, Smoke
 Abstract: Cannabis is one of the oldest cultivated plants in East Asia, grown for grain and fiber as well as for recreational, medical, and ritual purposes. It is one of the most widely used psychoactive drugs in the world today, but little is known about its early psychoactive use or when plants under cultivation evolved the phenotypical trait of increased specialized compound production. The archaeological evidence for ritualized consumption of cannabis is limited and contentious. Here, we present some of the earliest directly dated and scientifically verified evidence for ritual cannabis smoking. This phytochemical analysis indicates that cannabis plants were burned in wooden braziers during mortuary ceremonies at the Jirzankal Cemetery (ca. 500 BCE) in the eastern Pamirs region. This suggests cannabis was smoked as part of ritual and/or religious activities in western China by at least 2500 years ago and that the cannabis plants produced high levels of psychoactive compounds. © 2019 The Authors, some rights reserved.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-06-12
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aaw1391
Other: shh2276
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Science Advances
  Other : Sci. Adv.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington : AAAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 (6) Sequence Number: eaaw1391 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2375-2548
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2375-2548