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  Self-voice perception and its relationship with hallucination predisposition

Pinheiro, A. P., Farinha-Fernandes, A., Roberto, M. S., & Kotz, S. A. (2019). Self-voice perception and its relationship with hallucination predisposition. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 24(4), 237 -255. doi:10.1080/13546805.2019.1621159.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-ED58-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-723E-7
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Pinheiro, Ana P.1, Author
Farinha-Fernandes, Antonio1, Author
Roberto, Magda S.1, Author
Kotz, Sonja A.2, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Faculty of Psychology, University of Lisbon, Portugal, ou_persistent22              
2Faculty of Psychology and Neuroscience, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
3Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Hallucination predisposition; Self; Voice; Discrimination; Recognition
 Abstract: Introduction: Auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) are a core symptom of psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia but are also reported in 10–15% of the general population. Impairments in self-voice recognition are frequently reported in schizophrenia and associated with the severity of AVH, particularly when the self-voice has a negative quality. However, whether self-voice processing is also affected in nonclinical voice hearers remains to be specified. Methods: Thirty-five nonclinical participants varying in hallucination predisposition based on the Launay-Slade Hallucination Scale, listened to prerecorded words and vocalisations differing in identity (self/other) and emotional quality. In Experiment 1, participants indicated whether words were spoken in their own voice, another voice, or whether they were unsure (recognition task). They were also asked whether pairs of words/vocalisations were uttered by the same or by a different speaker (discrimination task). In Experiment 2, participants judged the emotional quality of the words/vocalisations. Results: In Experiment 1, hallucination predisposition affected voice discrimination and recognition, irrespective of stimulus valence. Hallucination predisposition did not affect the evaluation of the emotional valence of words/vocalisations (Experiment 2). Conclusions: These findings suggest that nonclinical participants with high HP experience altered voice identity processing, whereas HP does not affect the perception of vocal emotion. Specific alterations in self-voice perception in clinical and nonclinical voice hearers may establish a core feature of the psychosis continuum.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-08-272019-05-132019-06-10
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/13546805.2019.1621159
Other: Epub ahead of print
PMID: 31177920
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : PTDC/MHC-PCN/0101/2014
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia
Project name : -
Grant ID : BIAL 238/16
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Bial Foundation

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Title: Cognitive Neuropsychiatry
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 24 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 237 - 255 Identifier: ISSN: 1464-0619
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1464-0619