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  Ancient DNA sheds light on the genetic origins of early Iron Age Philistines

Feldman, M., Master, D. M., Bianco, R. A., Burri Promerová, M., Stockhammer, P. W., Mittnik, A., et al. (2019). Ancient DNA sheds light on the genetic origins of early Iron Age Philistines. Science Advances, 5(7): eaax0061. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aax0061.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FDF1-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FDF4-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Feldman, Michal1, Author              
Master, Daniel M., Author
Bianco, Raffaela A.2, Author              
Burri Promerová, Marta1, Author              
Stockhammer, Philipp W.2, Author              
Mittnik, Alissa2, Author              
Aja, Adam J., Author
Jeong, Choongwon3, Author              
Krause, Johannes2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              
2MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2541699              
3Eurasia3angle, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2301699              

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 Abstract: The ancient Mediterranean port city of Ashkelon, identified as “}Philistine{”} during the Iron Age, underwent a marked cultural change between the Late Bronze and the early Iron Age. It has been long debated whether this change was driven by a substantial movement of people, possibly linked to a larger migration of the so-called {“}Sea Peoples.{” Here, we report genome-wide data of 10 Bronze and Iron Age individuals from Ashkelon. We find that the early Iron Age population was genetically distinct due to a European-related admixture. This genetic signal is no longer detectible in the later Iron Age population. Our results support that a migration event occurred during the Bronze to Iron Age transition in Ashkelon but did not leave a long-lasting genetic signature.

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 Dates: 2019
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.aax0061
Other: shh2279
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Title: Science Advances
  Other : Sci. Adv.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Washington : AAAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 5 (7) Sequence Number: eaax0061 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2375-2548
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2375-2548