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  Detecting non-tree-like signal using multiple tree topologies

Verkerk, A. (2019). Detecting non-tree-like signal using multiple tree topologies. Journal of Historical Linguistics, 9(1), 9-69. doi:10.1075/jhl.17009.ver.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-FDF5-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-4D31-F
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Verkerk, Annemarie1, Author              
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1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: Austronesian, Bayesian phylogenetic inference, Indo-European, Japonic, language contact, reticulation and Sinitic
 Abstract: Recent applications of phylogenetic methods to historical linguistics have been criticized for assuming a tree structure in which ancestral languages differentiate and split up into daughter languages, while language evolution is inherently non-tree-like (François 2014; Blench 2015: 32–33). This article attempts to contribute to this debate by discussing the use of the multiple topologies method (Pagel & Meade 2006a) implemented in BayesPhylogenies (Pagel & Meade 2004). This method is applied to lexical datasets from four different language families: Austronesian (Gray, Drummond & Greenhill 2009), Sinitic (Ben Hamed & Wang 2006), Indo-European (Bouckaert et al. 2012), and Japonic (Lee & Hasegawa 2011). Evidence for multiple topologies is found in all families except, surprisingly, Austronesian. It is suggested that reticulation may arise from a number of processes, including dialect chain break-up, borrowing (both shortly after language splits and later on), incomplete lineage sorting, and characteristics of lexical datasets. It is shown that the multiple topologies method is a useful tool to study the dynamics of language evolution.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-07-022019-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 60
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1075/jhl.17009.ver
Other: shh2280
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Title: Journal of Historical Linguistics
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : John Benjamins
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 9 - 69 Identifier: ISSN: 2210-2116
ISSN: 2210-2124
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2210-2116