English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Mental representations of partner task cause interference in picture naming

Brehm, L., Taschenberger, L., & Meyer, A. S. (2019). Mental representations of partner task cause interference in picture naming. Acta Psychologica, 199: 102888. doi:10.1016/j.actpsy.2019.102888.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-585B-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-585C-3
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Brehm_etal_2019.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Brehm_etal_2019.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Brehm, Laurel1, Author              
Taschenberger, Linda, Author
Meyer, Antje S.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Psychology of Language Department, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_792545              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Interference in picture naming occurs from representing a partner's preparations to speak (Gambi, van de Cavey, & Pickering, 2015). We tested the origins of this interference using a simple non-communicative joint naming task based on Gambi et al. (2015), where response latencies indexed interference from partner task and partner speech content, and eye fixations to partner objects indexed overt attention. Experiment 1 contrasted a partner-present condition with a control partner-absent condition to establish the role of the partner in eliciting interference. For latencies, we observed interference from the partner's task and speech content, with interference increasing due to partner task in the partner-present condition. Eye-tracking measures showed that interference in naming was not due to overt attention to partner stimuli but to broad expectations about likely utterances. Experiment 2 examined whether an equivalent non-verbal task also elicited interference, as predicted from a language as joint action framework. We replicated the finding of interference due to partner task and again found no relationship between overt attention and interference. These results support Gambi et al. (2015). Individuals co-represent a partner's task while speaking, and doing so does not require overt attention to partner stimuli.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-07-052019-07-23
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.actpsy.2019.102888
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Acta Psychologica
  Other : Acta Psychol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 199 Sequence Number: 102888 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0001-6918
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925374822