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  Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia

Feldman, M., Fernández-Domínguez, E., Reynolds, L., Baird, D., Pearson, J., Hershkovitz, I., et al. (2019). Late Pleistocene human genome suggests a local origin for the first farmers of central Anatolia. Nature Communications, 10: 1218. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-09209-7.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-5DB1-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-6E93-B
Genre: Journal Article

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Feldman, Michal1, Author              
Fernández-Domínguez, Eva, Author
Reynolds, Luke, Author
Baird, Douglas, Author
Pearson, Jessica, Author
Hershkovitz, Israel, Author
May, Hila, Author
Goring-Morris, Nigel, Author
Benz, Marion, Author
Gresky, Julia, Author
Bianco, Raffaela A.2, Author              
Fairbairn, Andrew, Author
Mustafaoğlu, Gökhan, Author
Stockhammer, Philipp W.1, 2, Author              
Posth, Cosimo1, Author              
Haak, Wolfgang1, Author              
Jeong, Choongwon1, Author              
Krause, Johannes1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              
2MHAAM, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2541699              

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 Abstract: Anatolia was home to some of the earliest farming communities. It has been long debated whether a migration of farming groups introduced agriculture to central Anatolia. Here, we report the first genome-wide data from a 15,000-year-old Anatolian hunter-gatherer and from seven Anatolian and Levantine early farmers. We find high genetic continuity (~80–90%) between the hunter-gatherers and early farmers of Anatolia and detect two distinct incoming ancestries: an early Iranian/Caucasus related one and a later one linked to the ancient Levant. Finally, we observe a genetic link between southern Europe and the Near East predating 15,000 years ago. Our results suggest a limited role of human migration in the emergence of agriculture in central Anatolia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-03-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-09209-7
Other: shh2328
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Title: Nature Communications
  Abbreviation : Nat. Commun.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 1218 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2041-1723
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2041-1723