English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Higher fundamental frequency in bonobos is explained by larynx morphology

Grawunder, S., Crockford, C., Clay, Z., Kalan, A. K., Stevens, J. M., Stoessel, A., et al. (2018). Higher fundamental frequency in bonobos is explained by larynx morphology. Current Biology, 28(20), R1188-R1189. doi:10.1016/j.cub.2018.09.030.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2384.pdf (Publisher version), 402KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
shh2384.pdf
Description:
-
OA-Status:
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Grawunder, Sven, Author
Crockford, Catherine, Author
Clay, Zanna, Author
Kalan, Ammie K., Author
Stevens, Jeroen M.G., Author
Stoessel, Alexander1, Author           
Hohmann, Gottfried, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Summary Acoustic signals, shaped by natural and sexual selection, reveal ecological and social selection pressures [1]. Examining acoustic signals together with morphology can be particularly revealing. But this approach has rarely been applied to primates, where clues to the evolutionary trajectory of human communication may be found. Across vertebrate species, there is a close relationship between body size and acoustic parameters, such as formant dispersion and fundamental frequency (f0). Deviations from this acoustic allometry usually produce calls with a lower f0 than expected for a given body size, often due to morphological adaptations in the larynx or vocal tract [2]. An unusual example of an obvious mismatch between fundamental frequency and body size is found in the two closest living relatives of humans, bonobos (Pan paniscus) and chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Although these two ape species overlap in body size [3], bonobo calls have a strikingly higher f0 than corresponding calls from chimpanzees [4]. Here, we compare acoustic structures of calls from bonobos and chimpanzees in relation to their larynx morphology. We found that shorter vocal fold length in bonobos compared to chimpanzees accounted for species differences in f0, showing a rare case of positive selection for signal diminution in both bonobo sexes.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-10-222018-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 2
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2018.09.030
Other: shh2384
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Current Biology
  Other : Curr. Biol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, UK : Cell Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 28 (20) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: R1188 - R1189 Identifier: ISSN: 0960-9822
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925579107