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  Domestication and large animal interactions: Skeletal trauma in northern Vietnam during the hunter-gatherer Da But period

Scott, R. M., Buckley, H. R., Domett, K., Tromp, M., Trinh, H. H., Willis, A., et al. (2019). Domestication and large animal interactions: Skeletal trauma in northern Vietnam during the hunter-gatherer Da But period. PLoS One, 14(9): e0218777. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0218777.

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 Creators:
Scott, Rachel M., Author
Buckley, Hallie R., Author
Domett, Kate, Author
Tromp, Monica1, Author           
Trinh, Hiep Hoang, Author
Willis, Anna, Author
Matsumura, Hirofumi, Author
Oxenham, Marc F., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Bone fracture, Traumatic injury, Body limbs, Falls, Domestic animals, Diaphyses, Musculoskeletal injury, Archaeology
 Abstract: The aim of this paper is to test the hypothesis that healed traumatic injuries in the pre-Neolithic assemblage of Con Co Ngua, northern Vietnam (c. 6800–6200 cal BP) are consistent with large wild animal interactions prior to their domestication. The core sample included 110 adult (aged ≥ 18 years) individuals, while comparisons are made with an additional six skeletal series from Neolithic through to Iron Age Vietnam, Thailand, and Mongolia. All post cranial skeletal elements were assessed for signs of healed trauma and identified cases were further x-rayed. Crude trauma prevalence (14/110, 12.7) was not significantly different between males (8/52) and females (5/37) (χ2 = 0.061, p = 0.805). Nor were there significant differences in the prevalence of fractured limbs, although males displayed greater rates of lower limb bone trauma than females. Further, distinct from females, half the injured males suffered vertebral fractures, consistent with high-energy trauma. The first hypothesis is supported, while some support for the sexual divisions of labour was found. The prevalence and pattern of fractured limbs at CCN when compared with other Southeast and East Asian sites is most similar to the agropastoral site of Lamadong, China. The potential for skeletal trauma to assess animal trapping and herding practices prior to domestication in the past is discussed.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-09-04
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0218777
Other: shh2395
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (9) Sequence Number: e0218777 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850