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  Can BCI paradigms induce feelings of agency and responsibility over movements?

Nierula, B., & Sanchez-Vives, M. V. (2019). Can BCI paradigms induce feelings of agency and responsibility over movements? In Brain-computer interface research: A state-of-the-art summary 7 (pp. 103-114). Cham: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-05668-1_10.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-B5E7-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-4CD9-2
Genre: Book Chapter

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 Creators:
Nierula, Birgit1, 2, 3, Author              
Sanchez-Vives, Maria V. 3, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Pain Perception, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2497695              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634549              
3External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: BCI; Agency; Immersion; EEG; Avatar; Virtual reality; Virtual embodiment
 Abstract: The sense of agency is the attribution of an action to ourselves, which allows us to distinguish our own actions from those of other people and gives us a feeling of control and responsibility for their outcomes. Under physiological conditions, the sense of agency typically accompanies all our actions. Further, it can even be experienced over an illusory owned body—that is, a surrogate body perceived as if it were our own. However, the extent to which actions controlled through a brain–computer interface (BCI) also induce feelings of agency and responsibility is not well known. In the following chapter, we will review the relevant literature on body ownership and agency in virtual reality (VR) embodiment and outline an experiment in which participants controlled a virtual body through different BCI protocols based either on sensorimotor activity or on visually evoked potentials. Our findings show that BCI protocols can induce feelings of agency and that those BCI protocols based on sensorimotor activity have an advantage over those based on activity in visual areas. We further show that BCI protocols based on sensorimotor activity can even induce feelings of responsibility over the outcomes of that action, a finding that raises important ethical implications. We give particular focus to subjective reports from the debriefing after the experiment about the experience of BCI-induced agency over the action of a virtual body.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-07-09
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-05668-1_10
 Degree: -

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Title: Brain-computer interface research: A state-of-the-art summary 7
Source Genre: Book
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Publ. Info: Cham : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 103 - 114 Identifier: DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-05668-1
ISBN: 978-3-030-05667-4