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  A special role for the right posterior superior temporal sulcus during speech production

Yamamoto, A. K., Jones, O. P., Hope, T. M., Prejawa, S., Oberhuber, M., Ludersdorfer, P., et al. (2019). A special role for the right posterior superior temporal sulcus during speech production. NeuroImage, 203: 116184. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116184.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-B9D4-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-E55A-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Yamamoto, Adam Kenji1, 2, Author
Jones, Oiwi Parker3, 4, Author
Hope, Thomas M.H.3, Author
Prejawa, Suse3, 5, 6, Author              
Oberhuber, Marion3, Author
Ludersdorfer, Philipp3, Author
Yousry, Tarek A.1, 2, Author
Green, David W.7, Author
Price, Cathy J.3, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Brain Repair & Rehabilitation, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
2Lysholm Department of Neuroradiology, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging, Institute of Neurology, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4FMRIB Centre, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
5Collaborative Research Center Obesity Mechanisms, Institute of Biochemistry, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
7Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Speech production; Auditory feedback; Own speech; fMRI
 Abstract: This fMRI study of 24 healthy human participants investigated whether any part of the auditory cortex was more responsive to self-generated speech sounds compared to hearing another person speak. The results demonstrate a double dissociation in two different parts of the auditory cortex. In the right posterior superior temporal sulcus (RpSTS), activation was higher during speech production than listening to auditory stimuli, whereas in bilateral superior temporal gyri (STG), activation was higher for listening to auditory stimuli than during speech production. In the second part of the study, we investigated the function of the identified regions, by examining how activation changed across a range of listening and speech production tasks that systematically varied the demands on acoustic, semantic, phonological and orthographic processing. In RpSTS, activation during auditory conditions was higher in the absence of semantic cues, plausibly indicating increased attention to the spectral-temporal features of auditory inputs. In addition, RpSTS responded in the absence of any auditory inputs when participants were making one-back matching decisions on visually presented pseudowords. After analysing the influence of visual, phonological, semantic and orthographic processing, we propose that RpSTS (i) contributes to short term memory of speech sounds as well as (ii) spectral-temporal processing of auditory input and (iii) may play a role in integrating auditory expectations with auditory input. In contrast, activation in bilateral STG was sensitive to acoustic input and did not respond in the absence of auditory input. The special role of RpSTS during speech production therefore merits further investigation if we are to fully understand the neural mechanisms supporting speech production during speech acquisition, adult life, hearing loss and after brain injury.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-08-192019-03-012019-09-102019-09-112019-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2019.116184
PMID: 31520744
Other: Epub ahead of print
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Project name : -
Grant ID : 091593/Z/10/Z ; 97720/Z/11/Z ; 205103/Z/16/Z
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Wellcome Trust
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : National Institute for Health Research Biomedical Research Centre

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 203 Sequence Number: 116184 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166