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  Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa – Mechanisms, epidemiology and evolution

Botelho, J., Grosso, F., & Peixe, L. (2019). Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa – Mechanisms, epidemiology and evolution. Drug Resistance Updates, 44, 26-47. doi:10.1016/j.drup.2019.07.002.

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 Creators:
Botelho, João1, Author           
Grosso, Filipa, Author
Peixe, Luísa, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Fellow Group Antibiotic Resistance Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2600692              

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Free keywords: Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Antibiotic resistance, Integrative and conjugative elements, Plasmids, Fitness cost
 Abstract: Antibiotics are powerful drugs used in the treatment of bacterial infections. The inappropriate use of these medicines has driven the dissemination of antibiotic resistance (AR) in most bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen commonly involved in environmental- and difficult-to-treat hospital-acquired infections. This species is frequently resistant to several antibiotics, being in the “critical” category of the WHO's priority pathogens list for research and development of new antibiotics. In addition to a remarkable intrinsic resistance to several antibiotics, P. aeruginosa can acquire resistance through chromosomal mutations and acquisition of AR genes. P. aeruginosa has one of the largest bacterial genomes and possesses a significant assortment of genes acquired by horizontal gene transfer (HGT), which are frequently localized within integrons and mobile genetic elements (MGEs), such as transposons, insertion sequences, genomic islands, phages, plasmids and integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs). This genomic diversity results in a non-clonal population structure, punctuated by specific clones that are associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, the so-called high-risk clones. Acquisition of MGEs produces a fitness cost in the host, that can be eased over time by compensatory mutations during MGE-host coevolution. Even though plasmids and ICEs are important drivers of AR, the underlying evolutionary traits that promote this dissemination are poorly understood. In this review, we provide a comprehensive description of the main strategies involved in AR in P. aeruginosa and the leading drivers of HGT in this species. The most recently developed genomic tools that allowed a better understanding of the features contributing for the success of P. aeruginosa are discussed.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-07-112019-04-232019-07-122019-07-192019
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.drup.2019.07.002
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Title: Drug Resistance Updates
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 44 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 26 - 47 Identifier: Other: 1532-2084
ISSN: 1368-7646
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1368-7646