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  Economic change in the Prehistoric Hexi Corridor (4800–2200 bp), North-West China

Yang, Y., Ren, L., Dong, G. H., Cui, Y., Liu, R. J., Chen, G., et al. (2019). Economic change in the Prehistoric Hexi Corridor (4800–2200 bp), North-West China. Archaeometry, 61(4), 957-976. doi:10.1111/arcm.12464.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-D4AD-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-EE7A-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Yang, Yishi, Author
Ren, Lele, Author
Dong, Gai Hua, Author
Cui, Yifu, Author
Liu, Rong Jun, Author
Chen, Guoke, Author
Wang, Hui, Author
Wilkin, Shevan1, Author              
Chen, Fu-li, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: subsistence strategy, transcontinental culture exchange, culture evolution, Hexi Corridor, late Neolithic and Bronze Age
 Abstract: It is widely known that the Hexi Corridor in North-West China lies at a hub of trans-Eurasian cultural exchange. Its role became increasingly important during the late prehistoric period, particularly as the ancient Silk Road began to be used. While the profound transformation of local cultural characteristics in the late Neolithic and the Bronze Age is well documented, the detailed economic dynamics of cultural evolution have not yet been clearly illustrated. In this paper, we report on significant new zooarchaeological and faunal isotopic data from the Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in the Hexi Corridor. The primary objective is to systematically reconstruct the prehistoric economic context of this area by combining these new data with previous archaeological studies and radiocarbon dates. We argue that the primary economic activities of local inhabitants changed dramatically in the prehistoric Hexi Corridor. This was marked by agricultural production at c.4800–4000 bp, agro-pastoral production at c.4000–3000 bp and animal husbandry at c.3000–2200 bp, respectively. The major subsistence strategies of these three periods show considerable variation. It is very likely that these transformations of economic patterns in the prehistoric Hexi Corridor were primarily triggered by transcontinental cultural exchange and, to a lesser extent, by climate change.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-07-122019-02-27
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 20
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/arcm.12464
Other: shh2430
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Title: Archaeometry
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford University, Research Laboratory for Archaeology and the History of Art.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 61 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 957 - 976 Identifier: ISSN: 0003-813X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925381004