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  Obstetric complications and intelligence in patients on the schizophrenia-bipolar spectrum and healthy participants

Wortinger, L. A., Engen, K., Barth, C., Lonning, V., Jørgensen, K. N., Andreassen, O. A., et al. (2019). Obstetric complications and intelligence in patients on the schizophrenia-bipolar spectrum and healthy participants. Psychological Medicine. doi:10.1017/S0033291719002046.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-D6AC-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-E4D9-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Wortinger_2019.pdf (Publisher version), 268KB
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 Creators:
Wortinger, Laura Anne, Author
Engen, Kristine, Author
Barth, Claudia1, Author              
Lonning, Vera, Author
Jørgensen, Kjetil Nordbø, Author
Andreassen, Ole A., Author
Haukvik, Unn Kristin, Author
Vaskinn, Anja, Author
Ueland, Torill, Author
Agartz, Ingrid, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Bipolar spectrum; Cognition; Intelligence; Mood disorders bipolar; Neuropsychology; Obstetric complications; Obstetric gynecology; Premorbid IQ; Schizophrenia; Schizophrenia spectrum
 Abstract: Background Whether severe obstetric complications (OCs), which harm neural function in offspring, contribute to impaired cognition found in psychiatric disorders is currently unknown. Here, we sought to evaluate how a history of severe OCs is associated with cognitive functioning, indicated by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). Methods We evaluated the associations of a history of OCs and IQ in 622 healthy controls (HC) and 870 patients on the schizophrenia (SCZ) – bipolar disorder (BIP) spectrum from the ongoing Thematically Organized Psychosis study cohort, Oslo, Norway. Participants underwent assessments using the NART (premorbid IQ) and the WASI (current IQ). Information about OCs was obtained from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway. Multiple linear regression models were used for analysis. Results Severe OCs were equally common across groups. SCZ patients with OCs had lower performances on both premorbid and current IQ measures, compared to those without OCs. However, having experienced more than one co-occurring severe OC was associated with lower current IQ in all groups. Conclusions Severe OCs were associated with lower IQ in the SCZ group and in the BIP and HC groups, but only if they had experienced more than one severe OC. Low IQ might be a neurodevelopmental marker for SCZ; wherein, severe OCs influence cognitive abilities and increase the risk of developing SCZ. Considering OCs as a variable of neurodevelopmental risk for severe mental illness may promote the development of neuroprotective interventions, improve outcome in vulnerable newborns and advance our ability to make clinical prognoses.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-06-272019-03-182019-07-242019-08-28
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1017/S0033291719002046
Other: Epub ahead of print
PMID: 31456537
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Project name : -
Grant ID : 223273
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Research Council of Norway
Project name : -
Grant ID : 2017–093
Funding program : -
Funding organization : South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority

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Title: Psychological Medicine
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, England : Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0033-2917
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927634419