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  Neural Mechanisms of Overcoming Pavlovian Biases

Ahn, W.-Y., Dayan, P., Hill, K., Lohrenz, T., & Montague, R. (2013). Neural Mechanisms of Overcoming Pavlovian Biases. Poster presented at 1st Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM 2013), Princeton, NJ, USA.

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Ahn, W-Y, Author
Dayan, P1, Author           
Hill, K, Author
Lohrenz, T, Author
Montague, R, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Pavlovian biases, the best known of which is the approach and engagement engendered by re- ward predictors, is well established in animals and has been related to drug-seeking behavior. However, the neural mechanisms underlying individual differences in the ability to overcome Pavlovian biases remains un- clear. To address this, we scanned 74 healthy human participants with functional magnetic resonance imag- ing while they played a pre-existing reinforcement learning task that is designed to elucidate instrumental learning and its modulation by Pavlovian biases. Via computational modeling, we found strong behavioral evidence for a Pavlovian bias in the face of rewards but not punishments, which was consistent with previ- ous reports. Using model-based fMRI, we found several regions that were important for over- coming the Pavlovian bias, including the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), superior frontal gyrus, and hippocampus/parahippocampal gyrus. We also found that dorsolateral PFC (DLPFC), IFG, and superior temporal gyrus/medial temporal gyrus (STG/MTG) showed positive functional connectivity with mPFC while subjects successfully overcame the bias. By revealing behavioral and neural measures of indi- vidual differences in the propensity to exhibit Pavlovian biases, and a network of brain regions important for overcoming them, this work may have important implications for predicting/preventing relapse for drug addiction.

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 Dates: 2013-10
 Publication Status: Published online
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Title: 1st Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM 2013)
Place of Event: Princeton, NJ, USA
Start-/End Date: 2013-10-25 - 2013-10-27

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Title: 1st Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM 2013)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: F38 Start / End Page: 32 Identifier: -