English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Memory suppression and its deficiency in psychological disorders: A focused meta-analysis

Stramaccia, D., Rischer, K. M., Fawcett, J. M., & Benoit, R. G. (2019). Memory suppression and its deficiency in psychological disorders: A focused meta-analysis. PsyArXiv. doi:10.31234/osf.io/5wynm.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-EFA0-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0004-EFA1-9
Genre: Paper

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Stramaccia_2019.pdf (Preprint), 2MB
Name:
Stramaccia_2019.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Stramaccia, Davide1, Author              
Rischer, Katharina M.2, Author
Fawcett , Jonathan M. 2, Author
Benoit, Roland G.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Adaptive Memory, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2295691              
2External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: anxiety; cognitive control; depression; involuntary retrieval; suppression
 Abstract: It is hotly debated whether suppressing the retrieval of unwanted memories constitutes a beneficial mechanism that causes forgetting. Here, we scrutinize the evidence for such suppression-induced forgetting (SIF) and examine whether it is deficient in psychological disorders characterized by intrusive thoughts. Specifically, we performed a focused meta-analysis of studies that have used the Think/No-Think procedure to test SIF in individuals either affected by psychological disorders or exhibiting high scores on related traits. First, our analysis of the control samples (N = 534) indicated that avoiding retrieval indeed leads to reliable forgetting in healthy participants. Overall, the effect size was moderate to small (SMCC = 0.31, 95% CI [0.16, 0.45]) and remained significant after attempting to account for publication bias. However, moderator analyses revealed that this effect varied according to the exact mechanism that participants were instructed to engage, with the greatest effect size observed for direct retrieval suppression (SMCC = 0.63, 95% CI [0.36, 0.90]). Second, we found no evidence for SIF in the clinical/sub-clinical samples (N = 534, SMCC = 0.07, 95% CI [- 0.13, 0.28]). Critically, SIF in these samples was significantly smaller than in the respective control samples (SMD = 0.26 (95% CI [0.06, 0.47]). This deficiency was particularly pronounced when participants were instructed to apply direct retrieval suppression mechanism. These results suggest that intact suppression-induced forgetting is a hallmark of psychological well-being, and that inducing more specific suppression mechanisms fosters voluntary forgetting.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-05-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.31234/osf.io/5wynm
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: PsyArXiv
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: -