English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Fluorescence Microscopy with Nanometer Resolution

Sahl, S. J., Schönle, A., & Hell, S. W. (2019). Fluorescence Microscopy with Nanometer Resolution. Springer Handbook of Microscopy, 1089-1143. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-00069-1_22.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-0FB7-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-0FB8-C
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Hawkes_2019_SpringerHandbookOfMicroscopy_1089.pdf (Any fulltext), 7MB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
Hawkes_2019_SpringerHandbookOfMicroscopy_1089.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Restricted (Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, MHMF; )
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Sahl, Steffen J., Author
Schönle, Andreas, Author
Hell, S. W.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Optical Nanoscopy, Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Max Planck Society, ou_2364730              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: optical nanoscopy; super-resolution microscopy; single-molecule analysis; biophysical imaging; materials science
 Abstract: Throughout the twentieth century, it was widely accepted that a light microscope relying on propagating light waves and conventional optical lenses could not discern details that were much finer than about half the wavelength of light, or 200−400nm, due to diffraction. However, in the 1990s, the potential for overcoming the diffraction barrier was realized, and microscopy concepts were defined that now resolve fluorescent features down to molecular dimensions. This chapter discusses the simple yet powerful principles that make it possible to neutralize the resolution-limiting role of diffraction in far-field fluorescence nanoscopy methods such as STED, RESOLFT, PALM/"​"​STORM, or PAINT. In a nutshell, feature molecules residing closer than the diffraction barrier are transferred to different (quantum) states, usually a bright fluorescent state and a dark state, so that they become discernible for a brief period of detection. With nanoscopy, the interior of transparent samples, such as living cells and tissues, can be imaged at the nanoscale. A fresh look at the foundations shows that an in-depth description of the basic principles spawns powerful new concepts. Although they differ in some aspects, these concepts harness a local intensity minimum (of a doughnut-shaped or a standing wave pattern) for determining the coordinate of the fluorophore(s) to be registered. Most strikingly, by using an intensity minimum of the excitation light to establish the fluorophore position, MINFLUX nanoscopy has obtained the ultimate (super)resolution: the size of a molecule (≈1nm).

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 55
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-00069-1_22
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Springer Handbook of Microscopy
Source Genre: Book
 Creator(s):
Hawkes, Peter W., Author
Spence, John C. H., Author
Affiliations:
-
Publ. Info: Switzerland : Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1089 - 1143 Identifier: ISBN: 978-3-030-00068-4
ISBN: 978-3-030-00069-1