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  Cyanopolyyne chemistry around massive young stellar objects

Taniguchi, K., Herbst, E., Caselli, P., Paulive, A., Maffucci, D. M., & Saito, M. (2019). Cyanopolyyne chemistry around massive young stellar objects. The Astrophysical Journal, 881(1): 57. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/ab2d9e.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-2049-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-204A-4
Genre: Journal Article

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Taniguchi, Kotomi, Author
Herbst, Eric, Author
Caselli, Paola1, Author              
Paulive, Alec, Author
Maffucci, Dominique M., Author
Saito, Masao, Author
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1Center for Astrochemical Studies at MPE, MPI for Extraterrestrial Physics, Max Planck Society, ou_1950287              

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 Abstract: Recent radio astronomical observations have revealed that HC5N, the second shortest cyanopolyyne (HC2n+1N), is abundant around some massive young stellar objects (MYSOs), which is not predicted by classical carbon-chain chemistry. For example, the observed HC5N abundance toward the G28.28−0.36 MYSO is higher than that in L1527, which is one of the warm carbon-chain chemistry sources, by more than one order of magnitude. In this paper, we present chemical simulations of hot-core models with a warm-up period using the astrochemical code Nautilus. We find that the cyanopolyynes are formed initially in the gas phase and accreted onto the bulk and surface of granular ice mantles during the lukewarm phase, which occurs at 25 < T < 100 K. In slow warm-up period models, the peak abundances occur as the cyanopolyynes desorb from dust grains after the temperature rises above 100 K. The lower limits of the abundances of HC5N, CH3CCH, and CH3OH observed in the G28.28−0.36 MYSO can be reproduced in our hot-core models, after their desorption from dust grains. Moreover, previous observations suggested chemical diversity in envelopes around different MYSOs. We discuss possible interpretations of relationships between stages of the star formation process and such chemical diversity, such as the different warm-up timescales. This timescale depends not only on the mass of central stars but also on the relationship between the size of warm regions and their infall velocity.

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 Dates: 2019-08-13
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3847/1538-4357/ab2d9e
Other: LOCALID: 3176906
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Title: The Astrophysical Journal
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Bristol; Vienna : IOP Publishing; IAEA
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 881 (1) Sequence Number: 57 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0004-637X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922828215_3