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  The temporal evolution of conceptual object representations revealed through models of behavior, semantics and deep neural networks

Bankson, B. B., Hebart, M. N., Groen, I. I. A., & Baker, C. I. (2018). The temporal evolution of conceptual object representations revealed through models of behavior, semantics and deep neural networks. bioRxiv. doi:10.1101/223990.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-20C2-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-20C4-9
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Bankson, B. B.1, Author
Hebart, Martin N.1, Author              
Groen, I. I. A. 1, Author
Baker, C. I. 1, Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Visual object representations are commonly thought to emerge rapidly, yet it has remained unclear to what extent early brain responses reflect purely low-level visual features of these objects and how strongly those features contribute to later categorical or conceptual representations. Here, we aimed to estimate a lower temporal bound for the emergence of conceptual representations by defining two criteria that characterize such representations: 1) conceptual object representations should generalize across different exemplars of the same object, and 2) these representations should reflect high-level behavioral judgments. To test these criteria, we compared magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings between two groups of participants (n = 16 per group) exposed to different exemplar images of the same object concepts. Further, we disentangled low-level from high-level MEG responses by estimating the unique and shared contribution of models of behavioral judgments, semantics, and different layers of deep neural networks of visual object processing. We find that 1) both generalization across exemplars as well as generalization of object-related signals across time increase after 150 ms, peaking around 230 ms; 2) behavioral judgments explain the most unique variance in the response after 150 ms. Collectively, these results suggest a lower bound for the emergence of conceptual object representations around 150 ms following stimulus onset.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-04-09
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Rev. Type: No review
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/223990
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Title: bioRxiv
Source Genre: Journal
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