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  Radiocarbon dating and cultural dynamics across Mongolia’s early pastoral transition

Taylor, W., Wilkin, S., Wright, J., Dee, M., Erdene, M., Clark, J., et al. (2019). Radiocarbon dating and cultural dynamics across Mongolia’s early pastoral transition. PLoS One, 14(11): e0224241. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0224241.

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Taylor, William1, Author              
Wilkin, Shevan1, Author              
Wright, Joshua, Author
Dee, Michael, Author
Erdene, Myagmar, Author
Clark, Julia, Author
Tuvshinjargal, Tumurbaatar, Author
Bayarsaikhan, Jamsranjav, Author
Fitzhugh, William, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Afanasievo, Article, Bayes theorem, biological trait, body position, Bronze Age, Chemurchek, controlled study, cultural anthropology, economic aspect, fossil human, geography, human, human tissue, Mongolia, Munkhkhairkhan, prehistoric period, radiometric dating
 Abstract: The emergence of mobile herding lifeways in Mongolia and eastern Eurasia was one of the most crucial economic and cultural transitions in human prehistory. Understanding the process by which this played out, however, has been impeded by the absence of a precise chronological framework for the prehistoric era in Mongolia. One rare source of empirically dateable material useful for understanding eastern Eurasia’s pastoral tradition comes from the stone burial mounds and monumental constructions that began to appear across the landscape of Mongolia and adjacent regions during the Bronze Age (ca. 3000–700 BCE). Here, along with presenting 28 new radiocarbon dates from Mongolia’s earliest pastoral monumental burials, we synthesise, critically analyse, and model existing dates to present the first precision Bayesian radiocarbon model for the emergence and geographic spread of Bronze Age monument and burial forms. Model results demonstrate a cultural succession between ambiguously dated Afanasievo, Chemurchek, and Munkhkhairkhan traditions. Geographic patterning reveals the existence of important cultural frontiers during the second millennium BCE. This work demonstrates the utility of a Bayesian approach for investigating prehistoric cultural dynamics during the emergence of pastoral economies. This is an open access article, free of all copyright, and may be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, modified, built upon, or otherwise used by anyone for any lawful purpose. The work is made available under the Creative Commons CC0 public domain dedication.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-11-06
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 20
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0224241
Other: shh2457
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 14 (11) Sequence Number: e0224241 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850