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  Antimicrobial resistance genes present in the faecal microbiota of free-living Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis porteri)

Nieto‐Claudin, A., Esperón, F., Blake, S., & Deem, S. L. (2019). Antimicrobial resistance genes present in the faecal microbiota of free-living Galapagos tortoises (Chelonoidis porteri). Zoonoses and Public Health, 66, 900-908. doi:10.1111/zph.12639.

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 Creators:
Nieto‐Claudin, Ainoa , Author
Esperón, Fernando, Author
Blake, Stephen1, Author              
Deem, Sharon L., Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Migration, Max Planck Institute of Animal Behavior, Max Planck Society, ou_3054975              

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Free keywords: antibiotic resistance Galapagos Islands giant tortoises multi-resistant patterns wildlife surveillance time pcr assays staphylococcus-aureus escherichia-coli quantification management emergence diseases poultry samples health Public, Environmental & Occupational Health Infectious Diseases Veterinary Sciences
 Abstract: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR), encoded by plasmid-mediated AMR genes (ARGs), is an increasing global public health threat. Wildlife play a fundamental role as sentinels, reservoirs and potential vectors of ARGs. For the first time in Galapagos, we have identified and quantified the presence of ARGs in free-living giant tortoises (Chelonoidis porteri). We performed ARG analyses by quantitative PCR of faeces collected from the cloaca of 30 tortoises widely distributed across Santa Cruz Island. Validated samples (n = 28) were analysed by a panel of up to 21 different ARGs and all 28 tortoise samples were positive to one or more genes encoding resistance. Thirteen of 21 tested ARGs were present in at least one sample, and 10 tortoises (35.7%) had a multi-resistant pattern. We recommend additional research so we may more fully understand resistance patterns across taxa and geographical locations throughout the Galapagos archipelago, and the implications of ARGs for the health of wildlife, domestic animals, and humans. In this study, we found 100% of sampled giant tortoises had ARGs present in their faeces, suggesting a large-scale distribution of these genes within the archipelago.

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 Dates: 2019-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/zph.12639
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Title: Zoonoses and Public Health
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 66 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 900 - 908 Identifier: ISSN: 1863-2378