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  Mechanisms for active regulation of biomolecular condensates.

Söding, J., Zwicker, D., Sohrabi-Jahromi, S., Böhning, M., & Kirschbaum, J. (2020). Mechanisms for active regulation of biomolecular condensates. Trends in Cell Biology, 30(1), 4-14. doi:10.1016/j.tcb.2019.10.006.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-3F8B-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6F5F-6
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Söding, J.1, Author              
Zwicker, D.2, Author              
Sohrabi-Jahromi, S.1, Author              
Böhning, M.3, Author              
Kirschbaum, J.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group of Computational Biology, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1933286              
2Max Planck Research Group Theory of Biological Fluids, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2516693              
3Department of Cellular Logistics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578574              

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Free keywords: Cajal bodies; DNA repair; membraneless organelles; size control; stress granules; synapsin
 Abstract: Liquid-liquid phase separation is a key organizational principle in eukaryotic cells, on par with intracellular membranes. It allows cells to concentrate specific proteins into condensates, increasing reaction rates and achieving switch-like regulation. We propose two active mechanisms that can explain how cells regulate condensate formation and size. In both, the cell regulates the activity of an enzyme, often a kinase, that adds post-translational modifications to condensate proteins. In enrichment inhibition, the enzyme enriches in the condensate and weakens interactions, as seen in stress granules (SGs), Cajal bodies, and P granules. In localization-induction, condensates form around immobilized enzymes that strengthen interactions, as observed in DNA repair, transmembrane signaling, and microtubule assembly. These models can guide studies into the many emerging roles of biomolecular condensates.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-11-182020-01-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.tcb.2019.10.006
 Degree: -

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Title: Trends in Cell Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 30 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4 - 14 Identifier: -