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  Skull reconstruction of the late Miocene ape Rudapithecus hungaricus from Rudabánya, Hungary

Gunz, P., Kozakowski, S., Neubauer, S., Le Cabec, A., Kullmer, O., Benazzi, S., et al. (2020). Skull reconstruction of the late Miocene ape Rudapithecus hungaricus from Rudabánya, Hungary. Journal of Human Evolution, 138: 102687. doi:10.1016/j.jhevol.2019.102687.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-535E-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-535F-4
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Gunz, Philipp1, Author              
Kozakowski, Stephanie, Author
Neubauer, Simon1, Author              
Le Cabec, Adeline1, Author              
Kullmer, Ottmar, Author
Benazzi, Stefano, Author
Hublin, Jean-Jacques1, Author              
Begun, David R., Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Human Evolution, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497673              

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Free keywords: Fossil reconstruction, Miocene ape, Brain evolution, Hominoid evolution
 Abstract: We report on a computer-based reconstruction of a well-preserved ape skull from late Miocene deposits in Rudabánya, Hungary. Based on micro-computed tomographic scans of the original Rudapithecus hungaricus partial cranium RUD 200 and the associated mandible RUD 212 we realign displaced bone fragments, and reconstruct the shape of the upper and lower jaws guided by occlusal fingerprint analysis of dental wear patterns. We apply geometric morphometric methods based on several hundred landmarks and sliding semilandmarks to estimate missing data, and create multiple reconstructions of the specimen. We then compare the reconstructed overall cranial shape, as well as the volume and shape of the endocast, with extant primates. Multiple reconstructions of RUD 200 yield an average endocranial volume of 234 cc (S.D.: 9 cc; range: 221–247 cc). RUD 200 is most similar to African apes in overall cranial shape, but in a statistical analysis of endocranial shape the specimen falls closest to extant hylobatids. Our data suggest that R. hungaricus from the late Miocene in Europe displays aspects of the overall cranial geometry typical of extant African great apes, but it does not show an evolutionary reorganization of the brain evident in Pan, Gorilla, and Pongo.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.jhevol.2019.102687
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Title: Journal of Human Evolution
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 138 Sequence Number: 102687 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0047-2484