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  Boundary maintenance in the ancestral metazoan Hydra depends on histone acetylation

López-Quintero, J. A., Torres, G. G., Neme, R., & Bosch, T. C. (2020). Boundary maintenance in the ancestral metazoan Hydra depends on histone acetylation. Developmental Biology, xx(xx), xx-xx. doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2019.11.006.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-688C-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-688D-8
Genre: Journal Article

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1-s2.0-S0012160619300508-main.pdf (Publisher version), 5MB
 
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 Creators:
López-Quintero, Javier A., Author
Torres, Guillermo G., Author
Neme, Rafik1, 2, Author              
Bosch, Thomas C.G., Author
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              
2Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445635              

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Free keywords: Hydra, Patterning, Boundary, Histone deacetylation (HDAC), Epigenetics, EvoDevo
 Abstract: Much of boundary formation during development remains to be understood, despite being a defining feature of many animal taxa. Axial patterning of Hydra, a member of the ancient phylum Cnidaria which diverged prior to the bilaterian radiation, involves a steady-state of production and loss of tissue, and is dependent on an organizer located in the upper part of the head. We show that the sharp boundary separating tissue in the body column from head and foot tissue depends on histone acetylation. Histone deacetylation disrupts the boundary by affecting numerous developmental genes including Wnt components and prevents stem cells from entering the position dependent differentiation program. Overall, our results suggest that reversible histone acetylation is an ancient regulatory mechanism for partitioning the body axis into domains with specific identity, which was present in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians, at least 600 million years ago.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-11-042019-01-252019-11-122019-11-162020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.ydbio.2019.11.006
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Title: Developmental Biology
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Diego [etc.] : Academic Press
Pages: 15 Volume / Issue: xx (xx) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: xx - xx Identifier: ISSN: 0012-1606
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954927680586