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  Systemic acquired susceptibility caused by the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici

Seybold, H., Demetrowitsch, T., Hassani, M. A., Szymczak, S., Schwarz, K., & Stukenbrock, E. H. (2019). Systemic acquired susceptibility caused by the fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, 32(Supplement S), 51-51. doi:10.1094/MPMI-32-10-S1.1.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6BAB-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6BAC-2
Genre: Conference Report

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 Creators:
Seybold, H.1, Author              
Demetrowitsch, T., Author
Hassani, M. A.1, Author              
Szymczak, S., Author
Schwarz, K., Author
Stukenbrock, E. H.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Fellow Group Environmental Genomics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2068284              

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 Abstract: The fungal wheat pathogen Zymoseptoria tritici is the causal agent of Septoria tritici Blotch (STB), a major threat to wheat production worldwide. Infection begins with a symptom-free and presumably biotrophic phase of fungal growth followed by a lifestyle switch to necrotrophic growth. We aimed to elucidate the nature of the symptom-free infection phase and the putative immune suppression during biotrophic fungal growth. In addition to wheat cultivars of varying STB susceptibility, we used different pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae bacteria to study the physiological responses and the extent of immune suppression in wheat caused by Z. tritici. During the biotrophic infection, we observed that non-adapted P. syringae strains were able to co-infect wheat. This effect was not limited to the fungal infection site but extends to adjacent and systemic leaf areas. In contrast, after Z. tritici infection of wheat cultivars with STB resistance genes, we observed systemic acquired resistance also towards adapted P. syringae strains. Using a plant metabolomics approach, we could confirm the fungus-mediated local and systemic resistance suppression during colonization of susceptible wheat. Our findings suggest that (I) virulent Z. tritici infections of wheat cause systemic acquired susceptibility allowing colonization by non-adapted phytopathogens and (II) the fungal infection impacts leaf microbiome dynamics.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-10-012019-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1094/MPMI-32-10-S1.1
 Degree: -

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Title: 18th Congress of International-Society-for-Molecular-Plant-Microbe-Interactions (IS-MPMI)
Place of Event: Glasgow, Scotland
Start-/End Date: 2019-07-14 - 2019-07-18

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Title: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: St. Paul, MN : APS Press, 10
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (Supplement S) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 51 - 51 Identifier: ISSN: 0894-0282
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925558505