English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Emotion semantics show both cultural variation and universal structure

Jackson, J. C., Watts, J., Henry, T. R., List, J.-M., Forkel, R., Mucha, P. J., et al. (2019). Emotion semantics show both cultural variation and universal structure. Science, 366, 1517-1522. doi:10.1126/science.aaw8160.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-6D6B-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-5A71-6
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
shh2482.pdf (Publisher version), 663KB
 
File Permalink:
-
Name:
shh2482.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Private
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Jackson, Joshua Conrad, Author
Watts, Joseph1, Author              
Henry, Teague R., Author
List, Johann-Mattis2, Author              
Forkel, Robert1, Author              
Mucha, Peter J., Author
Greenhill, Simon J.1, Author              
Gray, Russell D.1, Author              
Lindquist, Kristen A., Author
Affiliations:
1Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              
2CALC, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2385703              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: It is unclear whether emotion terms have the same meaning across cultures. Jackson et al. examined nearly 2500 languages to determine the degree of similarity in linguistic networks of 24 emotion terms across cultures (see the Perspective by Majid). There were low levels of similarity, and thus high variability, in the meaning of emotion terms across cultures. Similarity of emotion terms could be predicted on the basis of the geographic proximity of the languages they originate from, their hedonic valence, and the physiological arousal they evoke.Science, this issue p. 1517; see also p. 1444Many human languages have words for emotions such as “}anger{”} and {“}fear,{”} yet it is not clear whether these emotions have similar meanings across languages, or why their meanings might vary. We estimate emotion semantics across a sample of 2474 spoken languages using {“}colexification{”}{—a phenomenon in which languages name semantically related concepts with the same word. Analyses show significant variation in networks of emotion concept colexification, which is predicted by the geographic proximity of language families. We also find evidence of universal structure in emotion colexification networks, with all families differentiating emotions primarily on the basis of hedonic valence and physiological activation. Our findings contribute to debates about universality and diversity in how humans understand and experience emotion.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20192019-12-20
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 6
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1126/science.aaw8160
Other: shh2482
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Science
  Other : Science
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : American Association for the Advancement of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 366 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1517 - 1522 Identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/991042748276600_1