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  Loving-kindness meditation - A queen of hearts?: A physio-phenomenological investigation on the variety of experience

Przyrembel, M., Vrticka, P., Engert, V., & Singer, T. (2019). Loving-kindness meditation - A queen of hearts?: A physio-phenomenological investigation on the variety of experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 26(7-8), 95-129.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-76B3-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-76B4-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Przyrembel, Marisa1, Author              
Vrticka, Pascal2, Author              
Engert, Veronika2, Author              
Singer, T.3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Social Neuroscience, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_634552              
2Research Group Social Stress and Family Health, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_3025667              
3Social Neuroscience Lab, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Compassion; Cortisol; Loving-kindness meditation; Micr-phenomenological interviews; Oxytocin; Self-compassion
 Abstract: Loving-kindness meditation (LKM) is a popular contemplative mental practice. Its purpose is to cultivate feelings of compassion, love, and prosocial motivation, typically through inner visual imagery and benevolent intentions. Previous studies have revealed evidence for various constructive effects of LKM. It remains an open question, however, whether the effects of LKM are exclusively positive in all practitioners. To tackle this question, we collected 55 microphenomenological interviews (MpIs) reflecting subjective experiences during LKM. Furthermore, we obtained psychological and biological (oxytocin, cortisol) inter-individual difference measures during a nine-month, longitudinal, mental training study. LKM was predominantly described in positive affective terms and associated with cortisol decrease in accordance with the natural diurnal decline, which reflects its generally non-stressful nature. However, five participants reported experiences such as panic, sadness, and fear. Emotional challenge, as indicated by negative word use during MpIs, was linked to lower scores of self-kindness and higher scores of selfcompassionate mindfulness.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-01-012019-07-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
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Title: Journal of Consciousness Studies
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Thorverton, Exeter, UK : Imprint Academic
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 26 (7-8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 95 - 129 Identifier: ISSN: 1355-8250
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110985819085907