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  The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Rhizophagus irregularis on soil microorganisms assessed by metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics

Lammel, D. R., Meierhofer, D., Johnston, P., Mbedi, S., & Rillig, M. C. (2019). The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and Rhizophagus irregularis on soil microorganisms assessed by metatranscriptomics and metaproteomics. bioRxiv (Preprint-Server). doi:10.1101/860932.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-7E9D-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-7E9E-D
Genre: Journal Article

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Lammel, D. R., Author
Meierhofer, D.1, Author              
Johnston, P., Author
Mbedi, S., Author
Rillig, M. C., Author
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1Mass Spectrometry (Head: David Meierhofer), Scientific Service (Head: Christoph Krukenkamp), Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1479669              

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 Abstract: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) form symbioses with approximately 80% of plant species and potentially benefit their hosts (e.g. nutrient acquisition) and the soil environment (e.g. soil aggregation). AMF also affect soil microbiota and soil multifunctionality. We manipulated AMF presence (via inoculation of non-sterile soil with Rhizophagus irregularis and using a hyphal compartment design) and used RNA-seq and metaproteomics to assess AMF roles in soil. The results indicated that AMF drove an active soil microbial community expressing transcripts and proteins related to nine metabolic functions, including the metabolism of C and N. We suggest two possible mechanisms: 1) the AMF hyphae produce exudates that select a beneficial community, or, 2) the hyphae compete with other soil microbes for available nutrients and consequently induce the community to mineralize nutrients from soil organic matter. We also identified candidate proteins that are potentially related to soil aggregation, such as Lpt and HSP60. Our results bridge microbial ecology and ecosystem functioning. We show that the AMF hyphosphere contains an active community related to soil respiration and nutrient cycling, thus potentially improving nutrient mineralization from soil organic matter and nutrient supply to the plants.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-12-08
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1101/860932
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Title: bioRxiv (Preprint-Server)
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cold Spring Harbor, NY : Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
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