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  Helping, fast and slow: Exploring intuitive cooperation in early ontogeny

Grossmann, T., Missana, M., & Vaish, A. (2020). Helping, fast and slow: Exploring intuitive cooperation in early ontogeny. Cognition, 196: 104144. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104144.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-8072-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-8073-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Grossmann, Tobias1, 2, Author              
Missana, Manuela2, 3, Author              
Vaish, Amrisha1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Early Social Development, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1356545              
3Institute of Educational Sciences, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Cooperative behavior is central to human societies. Human adults who reach their cooperative decisions more rapidly and independently of cognitive control display greater levels of prosocial behavior. This is taken to show that cooperation is guided by intuitive processes rather than by active control of selfish impulses. The current study investigated the emergence of intuitive cooperation in early human ontogeny. We measured helping behavior (latency and frequency) in a longitudinal sample of infants at ages 14 and 18 months. Between 14 and 18 months, the frequency of helping significantly increased and latency to help significantly decreased, suggesting advances in helping behavior during this period of development. Moreover, at 18 months and to some extent, even at 14 months, infants who helped more rapidly (as indexed by a shorter latency) acted more prosocially (as indexed by a greater frequency of helping) than infants who were slower to help. This link between latency and frequency of prosocial behavior was independent of infants' ability for inhibitory control and general sociability levels. Prosocial behavior thus begins to be governed by intuitive processes that operate independently of cognitive control early in human ontogeny. This informs our understanding of the nature and emergence of cooperative behavior by supporting accounts that assign a central role to intuition in the evolution of human cooperation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-11-082019-05-212019-11-152019-11-222020-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cognition.2019.104144
Other: Epub ahead of print
PMID: 31765923
 Degree: -

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Title: Cognition
  Other : Cognition
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 196 Sequence Number: 104144 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0010-0277
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925391298