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  Exploitation and utilization of tropical rainforests indicated in dental calculus of ancient Oceanic Lapita culture colonists

Tromp, M., Matisoo-Smith, E., Kinaston, R., Bedford, S., Spriggs, M., & Buckley, H. (2020). Exploitation and utilization of tropical rainforests indicated in dental calculus of ancient Oceanic Lapita culture colonists. Nature Human Behaviour, s41562-019-0808-y. doi:10.1038/s41562-019-0808-y.

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 Creators:
Tromp, Monica1, Author              
Matisoo-Smith, Elizabeth, Author
Kinaston, Rebecca2, Author              
Bedford, Stuart3, Author              
Spriggs, Matthew, Author
Buckley, Hallie, Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              
2Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              
3Linguistic and Cultural Evolution, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074311              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Behavioural ecology, Biological anthropology
 Abstract: Remote Oceania, which largely consists of islands covered in tropical forests, was the last region on earth to be successfully colonized by humans, beginning 3,000 years ago. We examined human dental calculus from burials in an ancient Lapita culture cemetery to gain insight into the early settlement of this previously untouched tropical environment, specifically on the island of Efate in Vanuatu. Dental calculus is an ideal material to analyse questions of human and plant interactions due to the ingestion of plant-derived microparticles that become incorporated into the calculus as it forms throughout a person’s life. Most of the microparticles identified here are from tree and shrub resources, including a ~2,900 calibrated (cal) bp example of banana in Remote Oceania, providing direct evidence for the importance of forests and arboriculture during the settlement of Remote Oceania.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-01-20
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 10
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41562-019-0808-y
Other: shh2497
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Title: Nature Human Behaviour
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Research
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: s41562-019-0808-y Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2397-3374
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2397-3374