English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  High-speed motility originates from cooperatively pushing and pulling flagella bundles in bilophotrichous bacteria

Bente, K., Mohammadinejad, S., Charsooghi, M., Bachmann, F., Codutti, A., Lefèvre, C. T., et al. (2020). High-speed motility originates from cooperatively pushing and pulling flagella bundles in bilophotrichous bacteria. eLife, 9: e47551. doi:10.7554/eLife.47551.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-A75C-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-A75D-7
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Article.pdf (Publisher version), 3MB
Name:
Article.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Bente, Klaas1, Author              
Mohammadinejad, Sarah2, Author              
Charsooghi, Mohammad1, Author              
Bachmann, Felix1, Author              
Codutti, Agnese1, Author              
Lefèvre, Christopher T, Author
Klumpp, Stefan, Author
Faivre, Damien1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Damien Faivre, Biomaterialien, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863290              
2Stefan Klumpp, Theorie & Bio-Systeme, Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Max Planck Society, ou_1863329              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Bacteria propel and change direction by rotating long, helical filaments, called flagella. The number of flagella, their arrangement on the cell body and their sense of rotation hypothetically determine the locomotion characteristics of a species. The movement of the most rapid microorganisms has in particular remained unexplored because of additional experimental limitations. We show that magnetotactic cocci with two flagella bundles on one pole swim faster than 500 µm·s-1 along a double helical path, making them one of the fastest natural microswimmers. We additionally reveal that the cells reorient in less than 5 ms, an order of magnitude faster than reported so far for any other bacteria. Using hydrodynamic modeling, we demonstrate that a mode where a pushing and a pulling bundle cooperate is the only possibility to enable both helical tracks and fast reorientations. The advantage of sheathed flagella bundles is the high rigidity, making high swimming speeds possible.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-01-282020
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.47551
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: eLife Sciences Publications, Ltd
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: e47551 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISBN: 2050-084X