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  The role of acceleration and jerk in perception of above-threshold surge motion

de Winkel, K., Soyka, F., & Bülthoff, H. (2020). The role of acceleration and jerk in perception of above-threshold surge motion. Experimental Brain Research, 238(3), 699-711. doi:10.1007/s00221-020-05745-7.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-A904-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-EB90-F
Genre: Journal Article

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de Winkel, K1, 2, Author              
Soyka, F1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Inertial motions may be defined in terms of acceleration and jerk, the time-derivative of acceleration. We investigated the relative contributions of these characteristics to the perceived intensity of motions. Participants were seated on a high-fidelity motion platform, and presented with 25 above-threshold 1 s forward (surge) motions that had acceleration values ranging between 0.5 and 2.5 [Formula: see text] and jerks between 20 and 60 [Formula: see text], in five steps each. Participants performed two tasks: a magnitude estimation task, where they provided subjective ratings of motion intensity for each motion, and a two-interval forced choice task, where they provided judgments on which motion of a pair was more intense, for all possible combinations of the above motion profiles. Analysis of the data shows that responses on both tasks may be explained by a single model, and that this model should include acceleration only. The finding that perceived motion intensity depends on acceleration only appears inconsistent with previous findings. We show that this discrepancy can be explained by considering the frequency content of the motions, and demonstrate that a linear time-invariant systems model of the otoliths and subsequent processing can account for the present data as well as for previous findings.

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 Dates: 2020-022020-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s00221-020-05745-7
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Title: Experimental Brain Research
  Other : Exp. Brain Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Heidelberg : Springer-Verlag
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 238 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 699 - 711 Identifier: ISSN: 0014-4819
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925398496