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  Articulatory/Phonetic Sequencing at the Level of the Anterior Perisylvian Cortex: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Study

Riecker, A., Ackermann, H., Wildgruber, D., Meyer, J., Dogil, G., Haider, H., et al. (2000). Articulatory/Phonetic Sequencing at the Level of the Anterior Perisylvian Cortex: A Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) Study. Brain and Language, 75(2), 259-276. doi:10.1006/brln.2000.2356.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-AF41-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-AF42-C
Genre: Journal Article

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Riecker, A, Author
Ackermann, H, Author
Wildgruber, D, Author
Meyer, J, Author
Dogil, G, Author
Haider, H, Author
Grodd, W1, Author              
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1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Damage to the anterior peri-intrasylvian cortex of the dominant hemisphere may give rise to a fairly consistent syndrome of articulatory deficits in the absence of relevant paresis of orofacial or laryngeal muscles (apraxia of speech, aphemia, or phonetic disintegration). The available clinical data are ambiguous with respect to the relevant lesion site, indicating either dysfunction of the premotor aspect of the lower precentral gyrus or the anterior insula in the depth of the Sylvian fissure. In order to further specify the functional anatomic substratum of this syndrome, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was performed during reiteration of syllables differing in their demands on articulatory/phonetic sequencing (CV versus CCCV versus CVCVCV). Horizontal tongue movements and a polysyllabic lexical item served as control conditions. Repetition of the CV and CCCV monosyllables elicited a rather bilateral symmetric hemodynamic response at the level of the anterior and posterior bank of the central sulcus (primary sensorimotor cortex), whereas a more limited area of neural activity arose within this domain during production of lexical and nonlexical polysyllables, significantly or exclusively lateralized toward the left hemisphere. There is neurophysiological evidence that primary sensorimotor cortex mediates the “fractionation” of movements. Assuming that the polysyllables considered are organized as coarticulated higher-order units, the observed restricted and lateralized cortical activation pattern, most presumably, reflects a mode of “nonindividualized” motor control posing fewer demands on “movement fractionation.” These findings may explain the clinical observation of disproportionately worse repetition of trisyllabic items as compared to monosyllables in apraxia of speech. The various test materials failed to elicit significant activation of the anterior insula. If at all, only horizontal tongue movements yielded a hemodynamic reaction extending beyond the sensorimotor cortex to premotor areas. Since limbic projections target the inferior dorsolateral frontal lobe, the enlarged region of activation during horizontal tongue movements might reflect increased attentional requirements of this task.

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 Dates: 2000-11
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1006/brln.2000.2356
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Title: Brain and Language
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 75 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 259 - 276 Identifier: ISSN: 0093-934X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922647078