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  Anthropogenic seed dispersal: rethinking the origins of plant domestication

Spengler, R. N. (2020). Anthropogenic seed dispersal: rethinking the origins of plant domestication. Trends in Plant Science, 25(4): 2020.01.005, pp. 340-348. doi:10.1016/j.tplants.2020.01.005.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-C7E0-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-E917-B
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Spengler, Robert N.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: domestication, seed dispersal, megafaunal extinction, origins of agriculture, crop evolution
 Abstract: It is well documented that ancient sickle harvesting led to tough rachises, but the other seed dispersal properties in crop progenitors are rarely discussed. The first steps toward domestication are evolutionary responses for the recruitment of humans as dispersers. Seed dispersal–based mutualism evolved from heavy human herbivory or seed predation. Plants that evolved traits to support human-mediated seed dispersal express greater fitness in increasingly anthropogenic ecosystems. The loss of dormancy, reduction in seed coat thickness, increased seed size, pericarp density, and sugar concentration all led to more-focused seed dispersal through seed saving and sowing. Some of the earliest plants to evolve domestication traits had weak seed dispersal processes in the wild, often due to the extinction of animal dispersers or short-distance mechanical dispersal.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-02-272020-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 9
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.tplants.2020.01.005
Other: shh2528
 Degree: -

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Project name : FEDD
Grant ID : 851102
Funding program : Horizon 2020 (H2020)
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Trends in Plant Science
  Other : Trends Plant Sci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Kidlington, Oxford : Elsevier Current Trends
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 25 (4) Sequence Number: 2020.01.005 Start / End Page: 340 - 348 Identifier: ISSN: 1360-1385
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925619141