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  Interactions of local movement detectors enhance the detection of rotation: Optokinetic experiments with the rock crab, Pachygrapsus marmoratus

Kern, R., Nalbach, H.-O., & Varjú, D. (1993). Interactions of local movement detectors enhance the detection of rotation: Optokinetic experiments with the rock crab, Pachygrapsus marmoratus. Visual Neuroscience, 10(4), 643-652. doi:10.1017/S0952523800005344.

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Kern, R, Author
Nalbach, H-O1, 2, Author           
Varjú, D, Author           
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
2Former Department Neurophysiology of Insect Behavior, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497802              

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 Abstract: Walking crabs move their eyes to compensate for retinal image motion only during rotation and not during translation, even when both components are superimposed. We tested in the rock crab, Pachygrapsus marmoratus, whether this ability to decompose optic flow may arise from topographical interactions of local movement detectors. We recorded the optokinetic eye movements of the rock crab in a sinusoidally oscillating drum which carried two 10-deg wide black vertical stripes. Their azimuthal separation varied from 20 to 180 deg, and each two-stripe configuration was presented at different azimuthal positions around the crab. In general, the responses are the stronger the more widely the stripes are separated. Furthermore, the response amplitude depends also strongly on the azimuthal positions of the stripes. We propose a model with excitatory interactions between pairs of movement detectors that quantitatively accounts for the enhanced optokinetic responses to widely separated textured patches in the visual field that move in phase. The interactions take place both within one eye and, predominantly, between both eyes. We conclude that these interactions aid in the detection of rotation.

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 Dates: 1993-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1017/S0952523800005344
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Title: Visual Neuroscience
  Other : Visual Neurosci.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Cambridge, England : Cambridge University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 643 - 652 Identifier: ISSN: 0952-5238
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925342749