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  Economic diversification supported the growth of Mongolia’s Nomadic Empires

Wilkin, S., Ventresca Miller, A., Miller, B. K., Spengler, R. N., Taylor, W. T. T., Fernandes, R., et al. (2020). Economic diversification supported the growth of Mongolia’s Nomadic Empires. Scientific Reports, 10(1): 3916. doi:10.1038/s41598-020-60194-0.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-D469-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-D46A-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Wilkin, Shevan1, Author              
Ventresca Miller, Alicia1, Author              
Miller, Bryan Kristopher1, Author              
Spengler, Robert N.1, Author              
Taylor, William Timothy Treal1, Author              
Fernandes, Ricardo1, Author              
Hagan, Richard W., Author
Bleasdale, Madeleine1, Author              
Zech, Jana1, Author              
Ulziibayar, S., Author
Myagmar, Erdene, Author
Boivin, Nicole1, Author              
Roberts, Patrick1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Archaeology, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074312              

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Free keywords: Archaeology, Population dynamics, Stable isotope analysis
 Abstract: Populations in Mongolia from the late second millennium B.C.E. through the Mongol Empire are traditionally assumed, by archaeologists and historians, to have maintained a highly specialized horse-facilitated form of mobile pastoralism. Until recently, a dearth of direct evidence for prehistoric human diet and subsistence economies in Mongolia has rendered systematic testing of this view impossible. Here, we present stable carbon and nitrogen isotope measurements of human bone collagen, and stable carbon isotope analysis of human enamel bioapatite, from 137 well-dated ancient Mongolian individuals spanning the period c. 4400 B.C.E. to 1300 C.E. Our results demonstrate an increase in consumption of C4 plants beginning at c. 800 B.C.E., almost certainly indicative of millet consumption, an interpretation supported by archaeological evidence. The escalating scale of millet consumption on the eastern Eurasian steppe over time, and an expansion of isotopic niche widths, indicate that historic Mongolian empires were supported by a diversification of economic strategies rather than uniform, specialized pastoralism.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2020-03-03
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 12
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-020-60194-0
Other: shh2531
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (1) Sequence Number: 3916 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322