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  Disparity-sensitive cells in the owl have a characteristic disparity

Wagner, H., & Frost, B. (1993). Disparity-sensitive cells in the owl have a characteristic disparity. Nature, 364(6440), 796-798. doi:10.1038/364796a0.

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https://www.nature.com/articles/364796a0.pdf (Publisher version)
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Wagner, H1, 2, Author              
Frost, B, Author
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1Former Department Comparative Neurobiology, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497800              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: WE experience the visual world as being three-dimensional. A major source of depth information derives from the slightly different views of each eye, leading to small variations in the retinal images ('disparities')' Neurons sensitive to visual disparities are thought to form the neural basis of stereo vision1–10. Barn owls2,3 as well as several mammalian species1,4–10 have neurons that are sensitive to visual disparities. But how visual disparities are represented in the brain has been a matter of discussion ever since the first disparity-sensitive neurons were found some 25 years ago. Here we adopt a new approach to this problem and study the neural computation of visual disparities with a paradigm borrowed from auditory research. The measurement of interaural time difference (ITD) has many similarities with the measurement of visual disparity on the formal, algorithmic level. We speculate that the similarities might extend to the level of neural computation. The neural representation of ITD is well understood11–18, and we have studied the representation of disparities with visual stimuli analogous to those successfully used in acoustic experiments. For example, ITD is converted in the brain to a pathlength on an axon that, owing to the finite conduction velocity in neurons, exactly matches the external ITD. This pathlength is called 'characteristic delay'12. Our results suggest that there is an analogue of the characteristic delay in stereo vision which we propose to call 'characteristic disparity'.

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 Dates: 1993-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/364796a0
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Title: Nature
  Abbreviation : Nature
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 364 (6440) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 796 - 798 Identifier: ISSN: 0028-0836
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925427238