English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Are social conflicts at work associated with depressive symptomatology? Results from the population-based LIFE-Adult-Study

Zuelke, A. F., Roehr, S., Schroeter, M. L., Witte, A. V., Hinz, A., Engel, C., et al. (2020). Are social conflicts at work associated with depressive symptomatology? Results from the population-based LIFE-Adult-Study. Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, 15: 1. doi:10.1186/s12995-020-0253-x.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-E82D-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-E82E-3
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Zuelke_2020.pdf (Publisher version), 406KB
Name:
Zuelke_2020.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Zuelke, Andrea F.1, Author
Roehr, Susanne1, Author
Schroeter, Matthias L.2, 3, Author              
Witte, A. Veronica2, Author              
Hinz, Andreas4, Author
Engel, Christoph5, Author
Enzenbach, Cornelia5, Author
Thiery, Joachim6, Author
Loeffler, Markus5, Author
Villringer, Arno2, 3, Author              
Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Institute of Social Medicine, Occupational Health and Public Health (ISAP), University Hospital Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
3Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Medical Psychology and Medical Sociology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5Institute for Medical Informatics, Statistics and Epidemiology (IMISE), University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Clinical Chemistry and Molecular Diagnostics (ILM), University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: CES-D; Depressive symptoms; Mental health; Psychosocial work environment; Social conflict; Multilevel model; O*NET
 Abstract: Background Psychosocial stressors in the workplace can be detrimental to mental health. Conflicts at work, e.g. aggression, hostility or threats from coworkers, supervisors or customers, can be considered a psychosocial stressor, possibly increasing risk for depressive symptoms. Existing studies, however, differ in the assessment of social conflicts, i.e. as individual- or job-level characteristics. Here, we investigated the association between conflicts at work assessed as objective job characteristics, and depressive symptomatology, using data from a large population-based sample. Additionally, we investigated gender differences and the impact of personality traits and social resources. Methods We used data from the population-based LIFE-Adult-Study from Leipzig, Germany. Information on conflicts at work, assessed as job characteristics, were drawn from the Occupational Information Network, depressive symptoms were assessed via the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Multilevel linear regression models with individuals and occupations as levels of analysis were applied to investigate the association between conflicts at work and depressive symptoms. Results Our sample included 2164 employed adults (age: 18–65 years, mean: 49.3, SD: 7.9) in 65 occupations. No association between conflicts s at work and depressive symptomatology was found (men: b = − 0.14; p = 0.74, women: b = 0.17, p = 0.72). Risk for depression was mostly explained by individual-level factors like e.g. neuroticism or level of social resources. The model showed slightly higher explanatory power in the female subsample. Conclusion Conflicts at work, assessed as objective job characteristics, were not associated with depressive symptoms. Possible links between interpersonal conflict and impaired mental health might rather be explained by subjective perceptions of social stressors and individual coping styles.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2019-09-132020-02-042020-02-12
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1186/s12995-020-0253-x
Other: eCollection
PMID: 32082403
PMC: PMC7017627
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London, United Kingdom : BioMed Central
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 15 Sequence Number: 1 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1745-6673
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1745-6673