English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Natural Formation of Chloro- and Bromoacetone in Salt Lakes of Western Australia

Sattler, T., Sörgel, M., Wittmer, J., Bourtsoukidis, E., Krause, T., Atlas, E., et al. (2019). Natural Formation of Chloro- and Bromoacetone in Salt Lakes of Western Australia. Atmosphere, 10(11): 663. doi:10.3390/atmos10110663.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Sattler, Tobias1, Author              
Sörgel, Matthias1, Author              
Wittmer, Julian2, Author
Bourtsoukidis, Efstratios1, Author              
Krause, Torsten2, Author
Atlas, Elliot2, Author
Benk, Simon2, Author
Bleicher, Sergej2, Author
Kamilli, Katharina2, Author
Ofner, Johannes2, Author
Kopetzky, Raimo2, Author
Held, Andreas2, Author
Palm, Wolf-Ulrich2, Author
Williams, Jonathan1, Author              
Zetzsch, Cornelius3, Author              
Schoeler, Heinz-Friedrich2, Author
Affiliations:
1Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826285              
2external, ou_persistent22              
3Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826290              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Western Australia is a semi-/arid region known for saline lakes with a wide range of geochemical parameters (pH 2.5-7.1, Cl- 10-200 g L-1. This study reports on the haloacetones chloro- and bromoacetone in air over 6 salt lake shorelines. Significant emissions of chloroacetone (up to 0.2 µmol m-2 h-1) and bromoacetone (up to 1. 5 µmol m-2 h-1) were detected, and a photochemical box model was employed to evaluate the contribution of their atmospheric formation from the olefinic hydrocarbons propene and methacrolein in the gas phase. The measured concentrations could not explain the photochemical halogenation reaction, indicating a strong hitherto unknown source of haloacetones. Aqueous-phase reactions of haloacetones, investigated in the laboratory using humic acid in concentrated salt solutions, were identified as alternative formation pathway by liquid-phase reactions, acid catalyzed enolization of ketones, and subsequent halogenation. In order to verify this mechanism, we made measurements of the Henry's law constants, rate constants for hydrolysis and nucleophilic exchange with chloride, UV-spectra and quantum yields for the photolysis of bromoacetone and 1,1-dibromoacetone in the aqueous phase. We suggest that heterogeneous processes induced by humic substances in the quasi-liquid layer of the salt crust, particle surfaces and the lake water are the predominating pathways for the formation of the observed haloacetones.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2019
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000502272000025
DOI: 10.3390/atmos10110663
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Atmosphere
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Basel, Switzerland : MDPI AG
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (11) Sequence Number: 663 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2073-4433
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2073-4433