English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Timescales of ongoing activity reflect local connectivity and are modulated during attention

Zeraati, R., Shi, Y., Gieselmann, M., Steinmetz, N., Moore, T., Thiele, A., et al. (2020). Timescales of ongoing activity reflect local connectivity and are modulated during attention. Poster presented at Computational and Systems Neuroscience Meeting (COSYNE 2020), Denver, CO, USA.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-EC22-B Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-EC23-A
Genre: Poster

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Zeraati, R1, Author              
Shi, Y, Author
Gieselmann, M, Author
Steinmetz, N, Author
Moore, T, Author
Thiele, A, Author
Engel, T, Author
Levina, A1, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Ongoing cortical dynamics unfold across different temporal scales. These timescales reflect the network’s specialization for task-relevant computations. However, it is unknown how different timescales emerge from the spatial network structure and whether they can be flexibly modulated by cognitive demands, e.g., during attention. We developed a network model which consists of binary units representing local neural populations (mini-columns) with spatially structured connections among them. We find that activity of the mini-columns exhibits two distinct timescales arising from the network dynamics. The first timescale is induced by recurrent excitation within a mini-column (vertical connectivity), and the second timescale is induced by interactions among mini-columns (horizontal connectivity). The timescales depend on the network topology, and the second timescale disappears in networks with random connectivity. To test model predictions, we analyzed spiking activity recorded from single cortical columns in the primate areas V1 and V4 during an attention task. We developed a novel method based on adaptive Approximate Bayesian Computations, which estimates the timescales from spiking activity and overcomes statistical biases due to finite sample size. We observed two timescales in both V1 and V4 population dynamics. Both timescales were significantly longer in V4 than in V1, which is explained by our model based on differences between V1 and V4 network properties. Moreover, the V1 and V4 timescales were longer when attention was directed toward neurons’ receptive-fields. This result reveals how ongoing network dynamics is influenced during top-down attention even without measurable modulations of firing rates in the absence of visual stimuli. Based on our model, modulation of timescales arises from an increase in efficacy of vertical connections and a slight suppression of horizontal interactions. Our results suggest that timescales of local neural dynamics emerge from the spatial network structure and can flexibly change due to top-down influences according to task demands.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2020-03
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: Computational and Systems Neuroscience Meeting (COSYNE 2020)
Place of Event: Denver, CO, USA
Start-/End Date: 2020-02-27 - 2020-03-01

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Computational and Systems Neuroscience Meeting (COSYNE 2020)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: III-84 Start / End Page: 241 Identifier: -