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  Interaction between primary and secondary mechanisms in human motion perception

Zanker, J., & Hüpgens, I. (1994). Interaction between primary and secondary mechanisms in human motion perception. Vision Research, 34(10), 1255-1266. doi:10.1016/0042-6989(94)90201-1.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-FCB2-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0006-0E39-C
Genre: Journal Article

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Zanker, JM1, 2, Author              
Hüpgens, IS1, 2, Author              
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1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              
2Former Department Structure and Function of Natural Nerve-Net , Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497803              

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 Abstract: Two layers of information processing can be distinguished as being involved in human motion perception. The primary motion detection stage processes displacements of the luminance distribution across space, such as experienced in natural scenes during the pursuit of moving targets. Primary motion detection is often investigated with artificial motion stimuli realized as random-dot kinematograms (RDKs). Such stimuli belong to the class of “Fourier motion”, and their perception can be easily explained by means of elementary motion detectors (EMDs) of the correlation type. Other tasks require the comparison of motion signals from neighbouring areas in the visual field. The perception of the displacement of the motion distribution, for instance, has been accounted for by a secondary motion processing stage. In order to understand the principles of interaction between the motion in neighbouring areas of the visual field, we investigated the sensitivity of the human visual system for moving objects which are defined by moving dots in variable directions. These experiments lead to “secondary tuning curves” of direction discrimination for secondary motion as function of primary motion direction. A base level of sensitivity for all dot motion directions without a velocity component in the same direction of the object movement is enhanced when the object and the dots have a common velocity component. Thus primary motion in any direction can be exploited by the secondary stage, and primary and secondary system both feed into the object motion percept. Furthermore it is suggested from the shape of the secondary tuning curve that the outputs from the two layers of motion processing do not superimpose linearly, but are combined by some sort of veto-like mechanism which increases the directional sensitivity when the two processing layers experience movement along the same direction.

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 Dates: 1994-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/0042-6989(94)90201-1
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Title: Vision Research
  Other : Vision Res.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Amsterdam : Pergamon
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 34 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1255 - 1266 Identifier: ISSN: 0042-6989
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925451842