English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Non‐adjacent dependency learning in humans and other animals

Wilson, B., Spierings, M., Ravignani, A., Mueller, J. L., Mintz, T. H., Wijnen, F., et al. (2020). Non‐adjacent dependency learning in humans and other animals. Topics in Cognitive Science, 12(3), 843-858. doi:10.1111/tops.12381.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Wilson_etal_2020_Non adjacent dependency learning in humans and other animals.pdf (Publisher version), 366KB
Name:
Wilson_etal_2020_Non adjacent dependency learning in humans and other animals.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
2020
Copyright Info:
© 2018 The Authors Topics in Cognitive Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Cognitive Science Society This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Wilson, Benjamin, Author
Spierings, Michelle, Author
Ravignani, Andrea1, 2, Author              
Mueller, Jutta L., Author
Mintz, Toben H., Author
Wijnen, Frank, Author
Van der Kant, Anne, Author
Smith, Kenny, Author
Rey, Arnaud, Author
Affiliations:
1Sealcentre Pieterburen, Pieterburen, The Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
2Vrije Universiteit Brussels, Brussels, Belgium, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Learning and processing natural language requires the ability to track syntactic relationships between words and phrases in a sentence, which are often separated by intervening material. These nonadjacent dependencies can be studied using artificial grammar learning paradigms and structured sequence processing tasks. These approaches have been used to demonstrate that human adults, infants and some nonhuman animals are able to detect and learn dependencies between nonadjacent elements within a sequence. However, learning nonadjacent dependencies appears to be more cognitively demanding than detecting dependencies between adjacent elements, and only occurs in certain circumstances. In this review, we discuss different types of nonadjacent dependencies in language and in artificial grammar learning experiments, and how these differences might impact learning. We summarize different types of perceptual cues that facilitate learning, by highlighting the relationship between dependent elements bringing them closer together either physically, attentionally, or perceptually. Finally, we review artificial grammar learning experiments in human adults, infants, and nonhuman animals, and discuss how similarities and differences observed across these groups can provide insights into how language is learned across development and how these language‐related abilities might have evolved.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-09-082020-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1111/tops.12381
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Topics in Cognitive Science
  Other : Top Cogn Sci
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford [u.a.] : Wiley-Blackwell
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 843 - 858 Identifier: ISSN: 1756-8757
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1756-8757